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The Spam Thread!
Ruby... no, not that Ruby, but this one.
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Ruby is the fully restored Acer Veriton M410 PC, currently loaded with Windows Vista Business 32bit.

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[Image: RubyExperience_053115.jpg]

You may notice that I have Windows Aero turned off. The reason is that some of my Adobe programs (one of them being Audition) shut off Aero when they run. Aero also seems to run a bit slow at times. I turned it off for these reasons. I also reverted to the classic Start Menu as the newer design looks downright ugly in the Classic theme.... it looks like a giant granite slab with letters on it.

I have tested rendering video in Adobe Premiere, and it's not too much different than Audrey. Rendering a 15-minute video at 29fps 4x3 Standard Def takes 15 to 20 minutes with two-pass WMV encoding, my usual codec choice. It took some more time to set it all up. Vista has no Divx codec by default, so I installed the Xvid codec to get Premiere to recognize this format. I tried official Divx, but it kills Divx audio in Premiere for some odd reason.

As for Audrey... I might have a plan for her, but it involves saving funds for a 2TB hard drive and another entry-level video card and WiFi.
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Well, make sure you get a UEFI-enabled video card this time. Most second generation 6000 series Radeon cards and newer are UEFI enabled. My recommendation would be to get a 6670 like the one in Clementine.

As for hard drive, are you sure you need 2TB? I'm getting away with just 1TB. For me, 2TB or higher is still server or NAS level and overkill for desktops.

Also, adding more RAM to Ruby may help- it says you're only running single channel. If the motherboard supports it, adding a second module to enable dual channel mode will boost performance noticeably. Also check the RAM type, it seems that you're running 667MHz modules, you'd get better performance if you use 800MHz modules.
The Best Medicine > Magic. Because SCIENCE! can prove the former.
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RAMChYLD Wrote:Well, make sure you get a UEFI-enabled video card this time. Most second generation 6000 series Radeon cards and newer are UEFI enabled. My recommendation would be to get a 6670 like the one in Clementine.

As for hard drive, are you sure you need 2TB? I'm getting away with just 1TB. For me, 2TB or higher is still server or NAS level and overkill for desktops.

Also, adding more RAM to Ruby may help- it says you're only running single channel. If the motherboard supports it, adding a second module to enable dual channel mode will boost performance noticeably. Also check the RAM type, it seems that you're running 667MHz modules, you'd get better performance if you use 800MHz modules.
If my plan comes to fruition, Audrey will be a file server that stores a lot of videos, hence the desire for a 2TB disk. I also do plan on getting a UEFI capable GPU as well, likely the 6670. Audrey needs a new PSU too, probably a 500w unit.

I do plan on giving Ruby 8GB RAM, but it will also require a 64bit OS. Ruby is basically designed for Windows Vista, so I may stick with that but I might go forward with Windows 7 64bit as Vista support ends two years from now. These upgrades will have to come later, probably this fall, after I save up more money to get the upgrades. Crucial RAM isn't cheap, but it's reliable.
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Hmmm, noted. Here's a thought tho- any possibility in getting the Vista 64-bit installation media from Microsoft or Acer, and then using back the same key? I think the keys are platform-agnostic and the 64-bit version of Vista should also work with a 32-bit key. And then buying a Windows 7 upgrade kit (which should be cheaper than the full version of Windows 7) when you're ready to move Ruby to Win7.
The Best Medicine > Magic. Because SCIENCE! can prove the former.
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RAMChYLD Wrote:Hmmm, noted. Here's a thought tho- any possibility in getting the Vista 64-bit installation media from Microsoft or Acer, and then using back the same key? I think the keys are platform-agnostic and the 64-bit version of Vista should also work with a 32-bit key. And then buying a Windows 7 upgrade kit (which should be cheaper than the full version of Windows 7) when you're ready to move Ruby to Win7.
My 32bit copy of Vista Business is an old student license copy I acquired while in college, so I don't think the key will work with a retail version. There is a Vista Business sticker on Ruby's side panel, and if I can acquire an 64bit OEM version, perhaps that key might work.

If not, some legit copies of Vista sourced on eBay do come with proper keys. I just have to be careful and scrutinize each listing so as not to get a bootleg copy.
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cpd2009 Wrote:If not, some legit copies of Vista sourced on eBay do come with proper keys. I just have to be careful and scrutinize each listing so as not to get a bootleg copy.
I think your existing student key will work with any retail x64 Vista Business DVD tho. You just need to call Microsoft and ask for the x64 version of the media- they may charge you for shipping and the media tho, but it probably won't cost as much as a new copy of the software or even the upgrade version. They'll ask you for the key to verify things- just don't mention that you're no longer a student (although I think they'll still honor the purchase, since when you bought it you were still a student).

Heck,give this site a try: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-recovery">http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-recovery</a><!-- m -->
The Best Medicine > Magic. Because SCIENCE! can prove the former.
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RAMChYLD Wrote:
cpd2009 Wrote:If not, some legit copies of Vista sourced on eBay do come with proper keys. I just have to be careful and scrutinize each listing so as not to get a bootleg copy.
I think your existing student key will work with any retail x64 Vista Business DVD tho. You just need to call Microsoft and ask for the x64 version of the media- they may charge you for shipping and the media tho, but it probably won't cost as much as a new copy of the software or even the upgrade version. They'll ask you for the key to verify things- just don't mention that you're no longer a student (although I think they'll still honor the purchase, since when you bought it you were still a student).

Heck,give this site a try: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-recovery">http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-recovery</a><!-- m -->
I didn't know that Software Recovery site existed. After I'm done eating supper, I will try it with Ruby and enter in the product key her case label has, despite referencing an Acer OEM install. It's worth a shot. On Greta, the link brings up a Windows 7 recovery option. I'm curious to see if that will reference Vista when I visit with Ruby.

This is also a good time to tell you how I found a copy of XP Home Edition for Timothy. Truth is, it's the original upgrade version my family received back at the end of 2001. We just ordered a new Gateway PC a few months earlier but it shipped with the horrid Windows ME. We were eligible for a free upgrade to XP Home since it was so close to release. It took forever to arrive in the mail (about three months), but we got it and had it installed. Part of that process was sticking on a new COA next to the WinME COA on the case.

I found that old XP Upgrade CD and located the product key on the old case, currently sitting outside next to the shed. The CD was an MS pressed copy with no motherboard lockout. I was first surprised to learn that I could initiate a full install by booting the CD during startup. When the time came to enter the product key, I did so, and it worked. Later on, I was also able to activate it successfully as well.

Since this copy of XP is RTM, I had to download redistributables of SP2 and SP3 to cut down on download times and to avoid getting a virus or worm.

I never knew that old copy of XP would once again be useful. I would have went with XP Pro, but Timothy runs well with Home Edition.
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I gave Ruby one more piece of hardware... my old Sound Blaster Audigy SE PCI sound card. It's model SB0570 and I think it uses the CA0106 chip.

It may not be the best Audigy series sound card, but it does have 24bit 96khz output capability. Makes my music sound great. Smile I put it in to enable 24-bit recording in Audition... her integrated Realtek audio only supports up to 16bit 48000khz.
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cpd2009 Wrote:Since this copy of XP is RTM, I had to download redistributables of SP2 and SP3 to cut down on download times and to avoid getting a virus or worm.
You could make a slipstreamed disc to save you the trouble in the future. This is one feature we techies sorely miss on Win7 and newer- the ability to roll our own updated Windows CD without going back to Microsoft for updated discs.
The Best Medicine > Magic. Because SCIENCE! can prove the former.
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RAMChYLD Wrote:
cpd2009 Wrote:Since this copy of XP is RTM, I had to download redistributables of SP2 and SP3 to cut down on download times and to avoid getting a virus or worm.
You could make a slipstreamed disc to save you the trouble in the future. This is one feature we techies sorely miss on Win7 and newer- the ability to roll our own updated Windows CD without going back to Microsoft for updated discs.
Now that you mentioned it, I might as well fetch an untouched Windows 7 disc with SP1 slipstreamed into it. I can get away with shoving in some stuff into my existing x64 installer, but for some reason I tend to opt more for a vanilla one and install other essentials afterwards.
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