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The Spam Thread!

Now that you mentioned Macs...
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/...ps-at-wwdc

It looks like Apple is indeed moving away from Intel starting next year. I reckon this would give users of legacy software a hard time unless Apple revives its Rosetta software, albeit with an x86-to-ARM dynarec for legacy applications to continue working to an extent.

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(06-10-2020, 09:25 AM)huckleberrypie Wrote:  Now that you mentioned Macs...
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/...ps-at-wwdc

It looks like Apple is indeed moving away from Intel starting next year. I reckon this would give users of legacy software a hard time unless Apple revives its Rosetta software, albeit with an x86-to-ARM dynarec for legacy applications to continue working to an extent.
I'd imagine this Intel-to-ARM transition will take a bit longer than their previous chip transitions. A lot of Mac users still use programs designed for x86-64 Intel CPUs, and they likely won't upgrade until their pro-level software becomes stable enough on ARM to be able to replace their Intel counterparts. Some just hang on to their old Macs until they break down or get too slow.

Maybe Adobe already has an ARM-compatible Creative Cloud ready to go. We won't know until WWDC comes and goes. I do have a basic free Apple Developer Account (so I could download Xcode), so I should be able to see WWDC live as it happens.

I still plan on ordering my Macbook toward the end of this week. Now, I'm on the fence. I've been watching video reviews of various refurb Macbooks that are still popular. Refurbished 2015 models are appealing, will still get support for several more years, and are more affordable. A 2012 model is also an option for my use case, but it depends on whether or not it will get the next macOS release which is doubtful. 2012 MBPs have entered the "Obsolete" category, but at present, can run Catalina without a patch.

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(06-10-2020, 10:09 AM)cpd2009 Wrote:  
(06-10-2020, 09:25 AM)huckleberrypie Wrote:  Now that you mentioned Macs...
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/...ps-at-wwdc

It looks like Apple is indeed moving away from Intel starting next year. I reckon this would give users of legacy software a hard time unless Apple revives its Rosetta software, albeit with an x86-to-ARM dynarec for legacy applications to continue working to an extent.
I'd imagine this Intel-to-ARM transition will take a bit longer than their previous chip transitions. A lot of Mac users still use programs designed for x86-64 Intel CPUs, and they likely won't upgrade until their pro-level software becomes stable enough on ARM to be able to replace their Intel counterparts. Some just hang on to their old Macs until they break down or get too slow.

Maybe Adobe already has an ARM-compatible Creative Cloud ready to go. We won't know until WWDC comes and goes. I do have a basic free Apple Developer Account (so I could download Xcode), so I should be able to see WWDC live as it happens.

I still plan on ordering my Macbook toward the end of this week. Now, I'm on the fence. I've been watching video reviews of various refurb Macbooks that are still popular. Refurbished 2015 models are appealing, will still get support for several more years, and are more affordable. A 2012 model is also an option for my use case, but it depends on whether or not it will get the next macOS release which is doubtful. 2012 MBPs have entered the "Obsolete" category, but at present, can run Catalina without a patch.
They could still at least produce x86 Macs for a time from what I've read, especially in the server and workstation markets given how ARM still appears to be playing catch-up with them Intel/AMD equivalents. It's not that ARM isn't capable of doing stuff though as evidenced by how even mid-range chips can emulate the PS2 and Gamecube to some degree, but ARM is more attuned towards lower power consumption than just raw grunt.

Not to mention the fact that game developers would have to port their stuff to ARM code, and the fears of Apple locking down their now ARM-powered computers even further than before. *Louis Rossmann rage intensifies*

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What makes it more concerning is the PC industry tends to follow Apple's lead to stay competitive. That's why MS branded devices are just as locked down as Apple's. Other Windows laptops are becoming the same way. If the PC industry starts adopting ARM processors to replace x86-64, it's going to create a headache for people who prefer to use Linux or just want to tinker with their hardware. The only computers that you can still upgrade yourself may just be expensive pro-rigs like the Mac Pro or a custom built PC rig.

Apple moving to ARM could kill off Boot Camp, unless they allow people to install an ARM-compatible version of Windows.

Despite the announcement, I did place my order for my MacBook Pro. I was going to get an refurbished 2019 MBP with the final butterfly keyboard since users have been saying it's the most reliable of those types, but I didn't want to take the risk. I also couldn't really find a decently priced used MBP with 16GB RAM and an SSD that was at least 256GB. So, to Apple it was. I started with the base model 13'' MBP with quad-core Intel Core i5 with Magic Keyboard, and chose 16GB RAM and 512GB SSD. The GPU is the standard Intel IGP, but for my intended usage, it will do fine.

One thing is for certain. I will be able to observe the Intel-to-ARM transition firsthand. I'm interested to see if it will herald the return of Universal Binaries, popular during the PPC-to-Intel transition. I only have one last question though. Rather than move to ARM, couldn't have they just gone with AMD? AMD is beating Intel in nearly every section of the CPU market, and they could be more willing to meet Apple's demands. But then again, Apple wants total control over the hardware and software like their iOS devices...

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(06-11-2020, 02:18 AM)cpd2009 Wrote:  What makes it more concerning is the PC industry tends to follow Apple's lead to stay competitive. That's why MS branded devices are just as locked down as Apple's. Other Windows laptops are becoming the same way. If the PC industry starts adopting ARM processors to replace x86-64, it's going to create a headache for people who prefer to use Linux or just want to tinker with their hardware. The only computers that you can still upgrade yourself may just be expensive pro-rigs like the Mac Pro or a custom built PC rig.

Apple moving to ARM could kill off Boot Camp, unless they allow people to install an ARM-compatible version of Windows.

Despite the announcement, I did place my order for my MacBook Pro. I was going to get an refurbished 2019 MBP with the final butterfly keyboard since users have been saying it's the most reliable of those types, but I didn't want to take the risk. I also couldn't really find a decently priced used MBP with 16GB RAM and an SSD that was at least 256GB. So, to Apple it was. I started with the base model 13'' MBP with quad-core Intel Core i5 with Magic Keyboard, and chose 16GB RAM and 512GB SSD. The GPU is the standard Intel IGP, but for my intended usage, it will do fine.

One thing is for certain. I will be able to observe the Intel-to-ARM transition firsthand. I'm interested to see if it will herald the return of Universal Binaries, popular during the PPC-to-Intel transition. I only have one last question though. Rather than move to ARM, couldn't have they just gone with AMD? AMD is beating Intel in nearly every section of the CPU market, and they could be more willing to meet Apple's demands. But then again, Apple wants total control over the hardware and software like their iOS devices...
It makes me wonder too. Though ARM is far more energy efficient hence the choice for that over x86 which has basically been stacked up with upgrades ever since it was conceived in the late seventies.

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Having a bit of trouble getting Windows Vista Basic updated with all security patches. Daffodil doesn't connect to the internet, but I still try to keep any version of Windows fully updated through the last released patches. Previously, I'd just use an offline installer for SP2, and try to download the remaining updates later. Well, second part isn't going so well. Windows Update hangs at the "Checking for Updates" phase and never advances further. I've even left it running for nearly 24 hours with no change.

Reinstalled Vista and will instead update to SP2 using Windows Update. If I still run into the update hang, I will just use Vista as is.

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Recently acquired a NOS Xbox 360 S-Video cable off eBay for a very good price because... well, hardly anyone has an original 2006 Xbox 360 anymore. Tongue Gone are the days where large, chunky proprietary analog video cables ruled supreme. HDMI came along and saved the day. But if your only option to play a 360 is on an analog TV, S-Video or component is the way to go.

S-Video, while not as good as component, is much sharper than composite. I can actually read the small subtitles now! I'm passing on the 360 Wifi adapter since my particular console is the original 2006 model that will fail someday.

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(06-13-2020, 11:15 AM)cpd2009 Wrote:  Recently acquired a NOS Xbox 360 S-Video cable off eBay for a very good price because... well, hardly anyone has an original 2006 Xbox 360 anymore. Tongue Gone are the days where large, chunky proprietary analog video cables ruled supreme. HDMI came along and saved the day. But if your only option to play a 360 is on an analog TV, S-Video or component is the way to go.

S-Video, while not as good as component, is much sharper than composite. I can actually read the small subtitles now! I'm passing on the 360 Wifi adapter since my particular console is the original 2006 model that will fail someday.
Now imagine playing Mafia II off a CRT using composite video or RF.  Those tiny condensed-type subtitles would certainly give you a headache.

And Microsoft would definitely never live down that period in the Xbox 360's lifecycle. For those operators who use converted 360s for arcade/coin-op use, you guys should just use the S or E models rather than end up setting fire to an OG model.

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I hope this really gives justice to the 2002 classic though. I mean sure the voice acting on the original was rather stiff and janky at points but the game still had its charm.

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You know... since I'm starting to get into more mature themed games, I might give Mafia/Mafia II a shot. (no pun intended... maybe Tongue ) I'd be interested to see how well the gameplay is on an RX580. The Mafia II benchmark ran pretty well as long you keep PhysX off.

Batman Arkham Asylum has been a blast. It's dark and gritty, but not dark enough to be a complete turn off and the aesthetic is expected for a Batman game. It kind of makes me want to seek out other Batman films, except for Batman & Robin. That's the film where everything went total camp like 1960s Batman.

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